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Serbia to increase renewables in electricity generation by 45.2% in new draft plan




Serbia’s Energy and Mining Ministry announced that a draft Integrated Energy and Climate Plan for 2030 with a 2050 outlook has been adopted by a working group comprised of public and private stakeholders.


According to the draft plan, by 2030, Serbia will aim to increase the share of renewables in electricity production to 45.2 per cent, reach a “significant increase” in energy efficiency and a 40.3 per cent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions compared to 1990.


To reach these targets, the plan envisages the construction of new production capacities, including solar and wind power plants with a total capacity of 3.4 gigawatts (GW), a new gas power plant with a capacity of 350 megawatts (MW) and an increase in the use of heat pumps and electric vehicles.


“Colleagues from the Ministry, together with members of the working group, worked intensively on this document for two and a half years, during a period in which there were many challenges and changes in energy, especially in Europe,” said Veljko Kovačević, State Secretary at the Ministry of Mining and Energy. “We tried to make the main goals set by this document ambitious, but also achievable, and to properly assess the impact of the planned measures and the dynamics of their implementation not only on the state, but also on the economy and households.”


Members of the working group include representatives from the Mining and Energy Ministry and other relevant ministries and state institutions, public enterprises and civil society organisations.


“The submitted comments contributed to the final version of the Draft Integrated Plan being significantly improved.” Thank you to all participants for their work, comments and discussions through which we sought the best solutions for the development of Serbia’s energy sector. Through this process, we have shown that INEKP [draft plan] is not only a strategic document, but also a topic that gathers and connects the professional and other public”, said State Secretary Kovačević.


During the public consultations that accompanied the preparation of this document, a total of around 549 comments were collected, as well as 31 recommendations from the Energy Community. A “significant number” of the received comments and recommendations have become part of this document, the ministry said in a press release.


The process of drafting the new plan was monitored by representatives from the Energy Community, the European Commission, the EU Delegation to Serbia, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) and the Japanese Business Alliance.

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