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Malaysia launches tender for 2 GW of solar power

The Malaysian government has kicked off a 2 GW solar tender featuring four packages of rooftop, ground-mount, and floating solar, with permitted generation capacities ranging from 1 MW to 500 MW.



Malaysia’s Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources has announced the fifth round of the nation’s Large Scale Solar (LSS5) tender.


It features four packages with permitted generation capacities ranging from 1 MW to 500 MW. The 2 GW up for grabs is more than double the capacity made available under the fourth round of the scheme in 2021. 


The first package includes 250 MW of rooftop or ground-mount solar plants, with permitted generation capacities of 1 MW to 10 MW. It is open to companies with at least 51% Bumiputera ownership (which refers to the Malay and indigenous people of Malaysia) that are registered as a small- and medium-size enterprises (SME) with SME Corp Malaysia.


The second package includes 250 MW of rooftop or ground-mount solar, but with permitted generation capacities of 10 MW to 30 MW. It is open to companies that have at least 51% Bumiputera ownership, or from consortia with at least one Bumiputera company holding at least 51% equity.


The third package covers 1 GW of rooftop or ground-mount solar power plants, with permitted generation capacities of 30 MW to 500 MW. The fourth package features 500 MW, and covers floating solar plants with permitted generation capacities of 10 MW to 500 MW.


The final two packages are open to companies that are incorporated in Malaysia with a minimum 51% local Malaysian equity, or consortia where at least one member is a company incorporated in Malaysia, with at least 51% local Malaysian equity.


Malaysia’s Energy Commission said solar plants developed under LSS5 are scheduled for operation in 2026.


Interested developers can submit proposals until April 16, at a cost of MYR 3,000 ($631). Submissions can be made to the Energy Commission until July 25.

Malaysia had installed 1,933 MW of solar by the end of 2023, according to data from the International Renewable Energy Agency.

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